General Studies

For students interested in pursuing a degree and transferring to a four-year institution, as a general rule, students should follow the Associate of Arts Degree in General Studies or the Associate of Science Degree in General Studies in a desired Pathway at Grayson College. All students are advised to counsel with the university/college of their choice to determine which courses offered at Grayson College are applicable to that institution's bachelor's degree in their desired major.


Associate of Science/Associate of Arts - General Studies

Subject Semester Hours
Component Area Option Core 3
ENGL 1301 3
American History Core 3
Mathematics Core 3
Social & Behavioral Sciences Core 3
Communication Core 3
American History Core 3
Life & Physical Science Core 3
Life & Physical Science Lab (CAO) 1
Language, Philosophy & Culture Core 3
Component Area Option Core 1
Government/Political Science Core 3
Life & Physical Science Core 3
Life & Physical Science Lab (CAO) 1
Academic Elective 3
Academic Elective 3
Academic Elective 3
Creative Arts Core 3
Government/Political Science Core 3
Academic Elective 3
Academic Elective 3
Academic Elective 3
total: 60

Note: All science courses at Grayson College must be taken with their corresponding labs.

The Associate of Science/Associate of Arts Degrees require that TSI requirements are met.

*Please review your Student Planner or contact your Student Success Coach/Faculty Advisor to review which courses may be used to fill this degree requirement.

*To receive a General Studies Associate of Arts Degree students must choose six hours from the following as their academic electives (Courses cannot be repeated for Credit): HIST 2321/2322, PHIL 1304, ENGL (2322, 2323, 2327, 2328, 2332, 2333, 2351), GEOG 1303, SPAN 2311 / 2312.

Students earning an Associate of Arts, Associate of Science, or Associate of Arts in Teaching Degree at Grayson College must complete 42 hours of a state mandated Core Curriculum in addition to major courses and electives in their particular area of interest. Following are the Core Curriculum Component Areas. List of allowable courses within each component area.

Component Areas Required Hours
010 Communication  6
020 Mathematics 3
030 Life and Physical Sciences 6
040 Language, Philosophy, and Culture 3
050 Creative Arts 3
060 American History 6
070 Government/Political Science 6
080 Social and Behavioral Sciences 3
090 Component Area Option 6
Total 42

Basic laboratory experiments supporting theoretical principles presented in ; introduction of the scientific method, experimental design, data collection and analysis, and preparation of laboratory report.

  Read More

Basic laboratory experiments supporting theoretical principles presented in ; introduction of the scientific method, experimental design, chemical instrumentation, data collection and analysis, and preparation of laboratory report.

  Read More

Fundamental principles of chemistry for majors in the sciences, health sciences, and engineering; topics include measurements, fundamental properties of matter, states of matter, chemical reactions, chemical stoichiometry, periodicity of elemental properties, atomic structure, chemical bonding, molecular structure, solutions, properties of gases, and an introduction to thermodynamics and descriptive chemistry. Corequisite CHEM 1111.

  Read More

Chemical equilibrium; phase diagrams and spectrometry; acidbase concepts; thermodynamics; kinetics; electrochemistry; nuclear chemistry; an introduction to organic chemistry and descriptive inorganic chemistry.

  Read More

Survey course introducing chemistry. Topics may include inorganic, organic, biochemistry,food/physiological chemistry, and environmental/consumer chemistry. Designed for allied health students and for students who are not science majors. Organic and biological chemistry are emphasized. This course provides the basic chemical background for understanding metabolism and other biological processes which occur in living organisms. Not to be taken by science majors.

  Read More

This laboratory-based course accompanies CHEM 2323, Organic Chemistry I. Laboratory activities will reinforce fundamental principles of organic chemistry, including the structure, bonding, properties, and reactivity of organic molecules; and properties and behavior of organic compounds and their derivatives. Emphasis is placed on organic synthesis and mechanisms. Includes study of covalent and ionic bonding, nomenclature, stereochemistry, structure and reactivity, reaction mechanisms, functional groups, and synthesis of simple molecules. Methods for the purification and identification of organic compounds will be examined.

  Read More

This laboratory-based course accompanies CHEM 2325, Organic Chemistry II. Laboratory activities reinforce advanced principles of organic chemistry, including the structure, properties, and reactivity of aliphatic and aromatic organic molecules; and properties and behavior of organic compounds and their derivatives. Emphasis is placed on organic synthesis and mechanisms. Includes study of covalent and ionic bonding, nomenclature, stereochemistry, structure and reactivity, reaction mechanisms, functional groups, and synthesis of simple molecules.

  Read More

Fundamental principles of organic chemistry will be studied, including the structure, bonding, properties, and reactivity of organic molecules; and properties and behavior of organic compounds and their derivatives. Emphasis is placed on organic synthesis and mechanisms. Includes study of covalent and ionic bonding, nomenclature, stereochemistry, structure and reactivity, reaction mechanisms, functional groups, and synthesis of simple molecules. This course is intended for students in science or pre- professional programs. Corequisite: CHEM 2123

  Read More

Advanced principles of organic chemistry will be studied, including the structure, properties, and reactivity of aliphatic and aromatic organic molecules; and properties and behavior of organic compounds and their derivatives. Emphasis is placed on organic synthesis and mechanisms. Includes study of covalent and ionic bonding, nomenclature, stereochemistry, structure and reactivity, reaction mechanisms, functional groups, and synthesis of simple molecules. This course is intended for students in science or pre-professional programs. Corequisite: CHEM 2125

  Read More

An instructional program designed to integrate on-campus study with practical hands-on work experience in the physical sciences. In conjunction with class seminars, the individual students will set specific goals and objectives in the scientific study of inanimate objects, processes of matter and energy, and associated phenomena.

  Read More

An analysis of the economy as a whole including measurement and determination of Aggregate Demand and Aggregate Supply, national income, inflation, and unemployment. Other topics include international trade, economic growth, business cycles, and fiscal policy and monetary policy

  Read More

Analysis of the behavior of individual economic agents, including consumer behavior and demand, producer behavior and supply, price and output decisions by firms under various market structures, factor markets, market failures, and international trade.

  Read More

An instructional program designed to integrate on-campus study with practical hands-on experience in economics. In conjunction with class seminars, the individual student will set specific goals and objectives in the study of human social behavior and/or social institutions

  Read More

Intensive study of and practice in writing processes, from invention and researching to drafting, revising, and editing, both individually and collaboratively. Emphasis on effective rhetorical choices, including audience, purpose, arrangement, and style. Focus on writing the academic essay as a vehicle for learning, communicating, and critical analysis.

  Read More

Intensive study of and practice in the strategies and techniques for developing research-based expository and persuasive texts. Emphasis on effective and ethical rhetorical inquiry, including primary and secondary research methods; critical reading of verbal, visual, and multimedia texts; systematic evaluation, synthesis, and documentation of information sources; and critical thinking about evidence and conclusions.

  Read More

Intensive study of and practice in professional settings. Focus on the types of documents necessary to make decisions and take action on the job, such as proposals, reports, instructions, policies and procedures, e-mail messages, letters, and descriptions of products and services. Practice individual and collaborative processes involved in the creation of ethical and efficient documents.

  Read More

A survey of the development of British literature from the Anglo-Saxon period to the Eighteenth Century. Students will study works of prose, poetry, drama, and fiction in relation to their historical, linguistic, and cultural contexts. Texts will be selected from a diverse group of authors and traditions.

  Read More

A survey of the development of British literature from the Romantic period to the present. Students will study works of prose, poetry, drama, and fiction in relation to their historical and cultural contexts. Texts will be selected from a diverse group of authors and traditions.

  Read More

A survey of American literature from the period of exploration and settlement through the Civil War. Students will study works of prose, poetry, drama, and fiction in relation to their historical and cultural contexts. Texts will be selected from among a diverse group of authors for what they reflect and reveal about the evolving American experience and character.

  Read More

A survey of American literature from the Civil War to the present. Students will study works of prose, poetry, drama, and fiction in relation to their historical and cultural contexts. Texts will be selected from among a diverse group of authors for what they reflect and reveal about the evolving American experience and character.

  Read More

A survey of world literature from the ancient world through the sixteenth century. Students will study works of prose, poetry, drama, and fiction in relation to their historical and cultural contexts. Texts will be selected from a diverse group of authors and traditions.

  Read More

A survey of world literature from the seventeenth century to the present. Students will study works of prose, poetry, drama, and fiction in relation to their historical and cultural contexts. Texts will be selected from a diverse group of authors and traditions.

  Read More

The study of one or more literary genres including, but not limited to, poetry, fiction, drama and film.

  Read More

A survey of Mexican American/Chicanx literature from Mesoamerica to the present. Students will study literary works of fiction, poetry, drama, essays, and memoirs in relation to their historical, linguistic, political, regional, gendered, and cultural contexts. Texts will be selected from a diverse group of authors, literary movements, and media forms. Topics and themes may include the literary performance of identity and culture, aesthetic mediation of racialization, struggle and protest, and artistic activism.

  Read More

This course introduces students to fundamental concepts, skills, and practices of human geography. Place, space, and scale serve as a framework for understanding patterns of human experience. Topics for discussion may include globalization, population and migration, culture, diffusion, political and economic systems, language, religion, gender, and ethnicity.

  Read More

This course is an introduction to the world’s major regions seen through their defining physical, social, cultural, political, and economic features. These regions are examined in terms of their physical and human characteristics and their interactions. The course emphasizes relations among regions on issues such as trade, economic development, conflict, and the role of regions in the globalization process.

  Read More

This laboratory-based course accompanies GEOL 1301, Earth Sciences I. Activities will cover methods used to collect and analyze data in geology, meteorology, oceanography, and astronomy. Corequisite of GEOL 1301

  Read More

This laboratory-based course accompanies GEOL 1303, Physical Geology. Laboratory activities will cover methods used to collect and analyze earth science data.

  Read More

This laboratory-based course accompanies GEOL 1304, Historical Geology. Laboratory activities will introduce methods used by scientists to interpret the history of life and major events in the physical development of Earth from rocks and fossils.

  Read More

This laboratory-based course accompanies GEOL 1305, Environmental Science (lecture). Activities will cover methods used to collect and analyze environmental data.

  Read More

Survey of geology, meteorology, oceanography, and astronomy. Corequisite of GEOL 1101

  Read More

Introduction to the study of the materials and processes that have modified and shaped the surface and interior of Earth over time. These processes are described by theories based on experimental data and geologic data gathered from field observations. Corequisite of GEOL 1103

  Read More

A comprehensive survey of the history of life and major events in the physical development of Earth as interpreted from rocks and fossils. Corequisite of GEOL 1104

  Read More

A survey of the forces, including humans, which shape our physical and biologic environment, and how these affect life on Earth. Introduction to the science and policy of global and regional environmental issues, including pollution, climate change, and sustainability of land, water, and energy resources. Corequisite of GEOL 1105

  Read More

A study of the United States and state constitutions, with special emphasis on Texas. Prerequisite: By permission only. Enrollment limited to students who have already completed a minimum of 6 SCH of government courses but have not satisfied the statutory requirement for the study of the federal and state constitutions. Ensures compliance with TEC §51.301.

  Read More

Introductory survey of the discipline of political science focusing on the scope, and methods of the field, and the substantive topics in the discipline including the theoretical foundations of politics, political interaction, political institutions and how political systems function.

  Read More

Origin and development of the U.S. Constitution, structure and powers of the national government including the legislative, executive, and judicial branches, federalism, political participation, the national election process, public policy, civil liberties and civil rights.

  Read More

Origin and development of the Texas constitution, structure and powers of state and local government, federalism and intergovernmental relations, political participation, the election process, public policy, and the political culture of Texas.

  Read More

A survey of the social, political, economic, cultural, and intellectual history of the United States from the pre-Columbian era to the Civil War/Reconstruction period. United States History I includes the study of pre-Columbian, colonial, revolutionary, early national, slavery and sectionalism, and the Civil War/Reconstruction eras. Themes that may be addressed in United States History I include: American settlement and diversity, American culture, religion, civil and human rights, technological change, economic change, immigration and migration, and creation of the federal government.

  Read More

A survey of the social, political, economic, cultural, and intellectual history of the United States from the Civil War/Reconstruction era to the present. United States History II examines industrialization, immigration, world wars, the Great Depression, Cold War and post-Cold War eras. Themes that may be addressed in United States History II include: American culture, religion, civil and human rights, technological change, economic change, immigration and migration, urbanization and suburbanization, the expansion of the federal government, and the study of U.S. foreign policy.

  Read More

A survey of the political, social, economic, cultural, and intellectual history of Texas from the pre-Columbian era to the present. Themes that may be addressed in Texas History include: Spanish colonization and Spanish Texas; Mexican Texas; the Republic of Texas; statehood and secession; oil, industrialization, and urbanization; civil rights; and modern Texas.

  Read More

A survey of the social, political, economic, cultural, religious, and intellectual history of Europe and the Mediterranean world from human origins to the 17th century. Themes that should be addressed in Western Civilization I include the cultural legacies of Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece, Rome, Byzantium, Islamic civilizations, and Europe through the Middle Ages, Renaissance, and Reformations.

  Read More

A survey of the social, political, economic, cultural, religious, and intellectual history of Europe and the Mediterranean world from the 17th century to the modern era. Themes that should be addressed in Western Civilization II include absolutism and constitutionalism, growth of nation states, the Enlightenment, revolutions, classical liberalism, industrialization, imperialism, global conflict, the Cold War, and globalism.

  Read More

A survey of the social, political, economic, cultural, religious, and intellectual history of the world from the emergence of human cultures through the 15th century. The course examines major cultural regions of the world in Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe, and Oceania and their global interactions over time. Themes include the emergence of early societies, the rise of civilizations, the development of political and legal systems, religion and philosophy, economic systems and trans-regional networks of exchange. The course emphasizes the development, interaction and impact of global exchange.

  Read More

A survey of the social, political, economic, cultural, religious, and intellectual history of the world from the 15th century to the present. The course examines major cultural regions of the world in Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe, and Oceania and their global interactions over time. Themes include maritime exploration and transoceanic empires, national/state formation and industrialization, imperialism, global conflicts and resolutions, and global economic integration. The course emphasizes the development, interaction and impact of global exchange.

  Read More

This stand-alone course is an interdisciplinary survey of cultures focusing on the philosophical and aesthetic factors in human values with an emphasis on the historical development of the individual and society and the need to create.

  Read More

This stand-alone course is an interdisciplinary survey of cultures focusing on the philosophical and aesthetic factors in human values with an emphasis on the historical development of the individual and society and the need to create.

  Read More

Integration of critical reading and academic writing skills. Successful completion of this course fulfills TSI requirements for reading and writing. This course is typically paired with ENGL 1301.

  Read More

Integration of critical reading and academic writing skills. Successful completion of this course enables a student to enroll in INRW 0210. INRW 0310 is typically paired with HUMA 1301.

  Read More

A study of major issues in philosophy and/or the work of major philosophical figures in philosophy. Topics in philosophy may include theories of reality, theories of knowledge, theories of value, and their practical applications.

  Read More

A comparative study of world religions, including but not limited to Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.

  Read More

The systematic evaluation of classical and/or contemporary ethical theories concerning the good life, human conduct in society, morals, and standards of value.

  Read More

A study of the major issues in the philosophy of religion such as the existence and nature of God, the relationships between faith and reason, the nature of religious language, religious experience, and the problem of evil.

  Read More

This laboratory-based course accompanies PHYS 1301, College Physics I. Laboratory activities will reinforce fundamental principles of physics, using algebra and trigonometry; the principles and applications of classical mechanics and thermodynamics, including harmonic motion, mechanical waves and sound, physical systems, Newton’s Laws of Motion, and gravitation and other fundamental forces; emphasis will be on problem solving. Corequisite of PHYS 1301

  Read More

This laboratory-based course accompanies PHYS 1302, College Physics II. Laboratory activities will reinforce fundamental principles of physics, using algebra and trigonometry; the principles and applications of electricity and magnetism, including circuits, electrostatics, electromagnetism, waves, sound, light, optics, and modern physics topics; with emphasis on problem solving. Corequisite of PHYS 1302

  Read More

Laboratory in the study of stars, galaxies, and the universe outside our solar system. Corequisite of PHYS 1303

  Read More

Laboratory in the study of the sun and its solar system, including its origin. Corequisite of PHYS 1304

  Read More

Course, designed for non-science majors, that surveys topics from physics, chemistry, geology, astronomy, and meteorology. Corequisite of PHYS 1315

  Read More

Fundamental principles of physics, using algebra and trigonometry; the principles and applications of classical mechanics and thermodynamics, including harmonic motion, mechanical waves and sound, physical systems, Newton’s Laws of Motion, and gravitation and other fundamental forces; with emphasis on problem solving. Corequisite of PHYS 1101

  Read More

Fundamental principles of physics, using algebra and trigonometry; the principles and applications of electricity and magnetism, including circuits, electrostatics, electromagnetism, waves, sound, light, optics, and modern physics topics; with emphasis on problem solving. Corequisite of PHYS 1102

  Read More

Study of stars, galaxies, and the universe outside our solar system. Corequisite of PHYS 1103

  Read More

Study of the sun and its solar system, including its origin. Corequisite of PHYS 1104

  Read More

Course designed for non-science majors that surveys topics from physics, chemistry, geology, astronomy, and meteorology. Corequisite of PHYS 1115

  Read More

Basic laboratory experiments supporting theoretical principles presented in PHYS 2325 involving the principles and applications of classical mechanics, including harmonic motion and physical systems; experimental design, data collection and analysis, and preparation of laboratory reports.

  Read More

Laboratory experiments supporting theoretical principles presented in PHYS 2326 involving the principles of electricity and magnetism, including circuits, electromagnetism, waves, sound, light, and optics; experimental design, data collection and analysis, and preparation of laboratory reports. Corequisite of PHYS 2326

  Read More

Fundamental principles of physics, using calculus, for science, computer science, and engineering majors; the principles and applications of classical mechanics, including harmonic motion, physical systems and thermodynamics; and emphasis on problem solving. Corequisite of PHYS 2125

  Read More

Principles of physics for science, computer science, and engineering majors, using calculus, involving the principles of electricity and magnetism, including circuits, electromagnetism, waves, sound, light, and optics. Corequisite of PHYS 2126

  Read More

A study of the (1) research and theory in the psychology of learning, cognition, and motivation, (2) factors that impact learning, and (3) application of learning strategies. Theoretical models of strategic learning, cognition, and motivation serve as the conceptual basis for the introduction of college-level student academic strategies. Students use assessment instruments (e.g., learning inventories) to help them identify their own strengths and weaknesses as strategic learners. Students are ultimately expected to integrate and apply the learning skills discussed across their own academic programs and become effective and efficient learners. Students developing these skills should be able to continually draw from the theoretical models they have learned.

  Read More

General Psychology is a survey of the major psychological topics, theories and approaches to the scientific study of behavior and mental processes.

  Read More

This course will provide an overview of the broad field of human sexuality. Topics will be covered from various perspectives – biological, sociological, anthropological, etc., but will focus primarily on the psychological perspective. The goal is for each student to learn factual, scientifically-based information that will provoke thought and contribute to his/her own decision-making on sexual issues outside of the classroom. Cross-listed as SOCI 2306.

  Read More

Life-Span Growth and Development is a study of social, emotional, cognitive and physical factors and influences of a developing human from conception to death.

  Read More

Study of the processes involved in adjustment of individuals to their personal and social environments.

  Read More

Study of individual behavior within the social environment. May include topics such as the socio-psychological process, attitude formation and change, interpersonal relations, and group processes. Cross-listed as SOCI 2326.

  Read More

This course provides an introduction to the psychological, biological, and socio-cultural factors involved in the development, diagnosis, and treatment of psychological disorders. It includes a review of the historical understanding of abnormal behavior and the development of modern diagnostic systems. It includes discussion of psychological research and practice as it relates to mental health and psychological functioning, as well as legal and ethical issues. (PSYC 2320 is included in the Psychology Field of Study.)

  Read More

An introduction to the biological bases of behavior. Topics include evolution, genetics, research methods in behavioral neuroscience, motivation and emotion, sensation and perception, learning and memory, lifespan development, cognition, psychological disorders, and other complex behaviors. (PSYC 2330 is included in the Psychology Field of Study.)

  Read More

Introduction to chemical components in agricultural applications. Topics include metric system, nomenclature, solutions, and pH in relation to the areas of soils and agricultural applications. Additional topics include chemical composition of grapes and wine, importance of pH in winemaking, titratable acidity, buffer capacity and equilibriums in wine, and fermentation end products.

  Read More

The scientific study of human society, including ways in which groups, social institutions, and individuals affect each other. Causes of social stability and social change are explored through the application of various theoretical perspectives, key concepts, and related research methods of sociology. Analysis of social issues in their institutional context may include topics such as social stratification, gender, race/ethnicity, and deviance.

  Read More

Application of sociological principles to the major problems of contemporary society such as inequality, crime and violence, substance abuse, deviance, or family problems.

  Read More

Sociological and theoretical analysis of the structures and functions of the family, the varied cultural patterns of the American family, and the relationships that exist among the individuals within the family, as well as the relationships that exist between the family and other institutions in society.

  Read More

This course will provide an overview of the broad field of human sexuality. Topics will be covered from various perspectives – biological, sociological, anthropological, etc., but will focus primarily on the psychological perspective. The goal is for each student to learn factual, scientifically based information that will provoke thought and contribute to his/her own decision-making on sexual issues outside of the classroom.

  Read More

This course studies minority-majority group relations, addressing their historical, cultural, social, economic, and institutional development in the United States. Both sociological and social psychological levels of analysis will be employed to discuss issues including experiences of minority groups within the context of their cultural heritage and tradition, as well as that of the dominant culture. Core concepts to be examined include (but are not limited to) social inequality, dominance/subordination, prejudice, and discrimination. Particular minority groups discussed may include those based on poverty, race/ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, age, disability, or religion.

  Read More

Study of individual behavior within the social environment. May include topics such as the socio-psychological process, attitude formation and change, interpersonal relations, and group processes.

  Read More

The course surveys various theories of crime, with an emphasis on understanding the social causes of criminal behavior. The techniques for measuring crime as a social phenomenon and the characteristics of criminals are examined. This course addresses crime types (such as consensual or white-collar crimes), the criminal justice system, and other social responses to crime.

  Read More

Study of the use and abuse of drugs in today's society. Emphasizes the physiological, sociological, and psychological factors.

  Read More

An instructional program designed to integrate on-campus study with practical hands-on experience in sociology. In conjunction with class seminars, the individual student will set specific goals and objectives in the study of human social behavior and/or social institutions.

  Read More

Basic practice in comprehension and production of the spoken language.

  Read More

Basic Spanish language skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing within a cultural framework. Students will acquire the vocabulary and grammatical structures necessary to communicate and comprehend at the beginner level.

  Read More

Continued development of basic Spanish language skills in listening, speaking reading, and writing within a cultural framework. Students acquire the vocabulary and grammatical structures necessary to communicate and comprehend at the high beginner to low intermediate level.

  Read More

The consolidation of skills acquired at the introductory level. Further development of proficiency in listening, speaking, reading and writing. Emphasis on comprehension, appreciation, and interpretation of the cultures of the Spanish-speaking world.

  Read More

The consolidation of skills acquired at the Introductory level. Further development of proficiency in listening, speaking, reading and writing. Emphasis on comprehension, appreciation, and interpretation of the cultures of the Spanish-speaking world.

  Read More

An instructional program designed to integrate on-campus study with practical hands-on work experience in the physical sciences. In conjunction with class seminars, the individual students will set specific goals and objectives in the scientific study of inanimate objects, processes of matter and energy, and associated phenomena.

  Read More

Introduces basic human communication principles and theories embedded in a variety of contexts including interpersonal, small group, and public speaking. (R W)

  Read More

Application of communication theory and practice to the public speaking context, with emphasis on audience analysis, speaker delivery, ethics of communication, cultural diversity, and speech organizational techniques to develop students' speaking abilities, as well as ability to effectively evaluate oral presentations. (R W)

  Read More

Application of communication theory to interpersonal relationship development, maintenance, and termination in relationship contexts including friendships, romantic partners, families, and relationships with co-workers and supervisors.

  Read More

Study and application of communication within the business and professional context. Special emphasis will be given to communication competencies in presentations, dyads, teams and technologically mediated formats. (R W)

  Read More

Theories and practice in argumentation and debate including analysis, reasoning, organization, 235 evidence, and refutation.

  Read More

Last updated: 01/28/2021