Academic Regulations

Credit for Courses

Credit is granted on the basis of semester hours at Grayson College. Generally, a semester hour of credit is given for satisfactory performance in one lecture period of 50 minutes per week for a 16-week semester or equivalent. Two hours of laboratory work are usually considered to be the equivalent of one hour of lecture.

Credit for Transfer Courses

Credit for courses in which a passing grade ("D" or better) has been earned may be transferred to the college from colleges and universities accredited through regional associations.  Appropriate Grayson College personnel will complete course-by-course evaluations as needed for degree or program planning. See the Advising office for a degree audit once all official transcripts have been received.

Individual courses transferred will not be posted to the student's record. Official transcripts from all higher education institutions must be on file in the Registrar's Office. Generally, the college will not accept junior and senior level coursework as transfer credit unless there is an approved articulation agreement with the specific four-year college or university.

Credit for Foreign Courses

Students requesting credit for foreign coursework must first apply for admission to Grayson College (GC) and enroll in courses. To receive transfer credit from foreign institutions, students must bring an official copy of their college transcript and a course-by-course international credential evaluation from a foreign credential evaluation service recognized as a member of the National Association of Credential Evaluation Services (NACES), such as World Education Services (WES) or Foreign Credential Service of America (FCSA) to the GC Admissions Office. The request for evaluation and any costs associated are the responsibility of the student.

GC will determine the total number of semester transfer credits by the end of the first semester of enrollment at GC. To avoid additional costs and delays in posting information, students are encouraged to acquire these materials promptly. GC does not accept foreign coursework for courses in English and Speech.

For the purpose of the Texas Success Initiative (TSI), students who have completed the equivalent of a U.S. associates or bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university outside the United States are exempt from placement testing. In order to receive this exemption, students must bring an official copy of their college transcript and a course-by-course international credential evaluation from a foreign credential evaluation service recognized as a member of the National Association of Credential Evaluation Services (NACES), such as World Education Services (WES) or Foreign Credential Service of America (FCSA) to the GC Admissions Office. The request for evaluation and any costs associated are the responsibility of the student. Foreign students who have not completed a degree are required to meet TSI requirements before enrolling in courses that lead to an associate degree. Students enrolling in certificate programs must complete the required placement testing for the certificate they are seeking.

Resolution of Transfer Disputes

The following procedures shall be followed by public institutions of higher education in the resolution of credit transfer disputes involving lower-division courses:

      (1)    If an institution of higher education does not accept course credit earned by a student at another institution of higher education, the receiving institution shall give written notice to the student and to the sending institution that transfer of the course credit is denied.

      (2)    The two institutions and the student shall attempt to resolve the transfer of the course credit in accordance with Board rules and/or guidelines.

      (3)    If the transfer dispute is not resolved to the satisfaction of the student or the sending institution within 45 days after the date the student received written notice of denial, the institution whose credit is denied for transfer shall notify the Commissioner of the denial.

The Commissioner of Higher Education or the Commissioner’s designee shall make the final determination about the dispute concerning the transfer of course credit and give written notice of the determination to the involved student and institutions.

Student Classification

Academic Level. Students are classified as freshmen, sophomore or special students according to the amount of work they have completed. A freshman is one who has completed less than thirty semester hours of college credit; a sophomore is one who has completed at least thirty but less than sixty semester hours of college credit. A student who has earned sixty or more semester hours is classified as a special student.

Student Load

Academic Load. Students who are enrolled for twelve or more semester hours are considered full-time students.

Long Sessions. The normal load during the regular semester is six (6) academic courses or from fourteen to eighteen semester hours. Credit hours are taken during a 1st Half-Session and 2nd Half-Session are added to classes taken during the long session to determine academic loads. Students who wish to enroll in nineteen or more credit hours must obtain the permission of either the Director of Counseling Services, appropriate Dean, or the Director of Admissions and Records.

Summer Session. The normal load during each term of the summer session is six semester hours. The maximum load for a six-week term is seven semester hours. Students may not earn in excess of fourteen semester hours during the two-term summer session, including summer evening sessions.

Mini Sessions. Students can enroll in two courses for the 5 week mini-session or one course for the 3 week mini-session or one course for the 5 week and course in the 3 week. Students may not enroll in two courses in the 5 week and one course in the three week.

Mid Term Session. The normal load for the eight-week term is two academic courses. However, the normal load during the regular long semester is six (6) academic courses or from fourteen to eighteen semester hours. Credit hours taken during a 1st Half-Session and 2nd Half-Session are added to classes taken during the long session to determine academic loads. Students who wish to enroll in nineteen or more credit hours must obtain the permission of either the Director of Counseling Services, Dean of Academic Instruction, or the Director of Admissions and Records.

Course Load (ECC Local). The normal course load for the fall or spring semester shall be 15 semester hours.  Course loads in excess of 16 semester hours shall require approval by the Vice President of Instruction. The maximum course load shall be no more than 21 semester hours.

The normal course load for the summer session shall be six semester hours for each six-week term or 12 semester hours for a full summer semester.  Course loads in excess of six semester hours per term or 12 semester hours per summer semester shall require approval by the vice president for student affairs.  The maximum summer credit hours earned shall be eight semester hours for one term or 16 semester hours for a full summer semester.

Auditing a Course

When space is available, persons wishing to audit a course may do so by completing an application and meeting the admission criteria stated in the Admissions section of the Catalog. Full tuition will be charged for auditing a course. Auditors must complete the Request for Audit form in the Admissions office on or before the official census date published in the acadecmic calendar. After the official census date, a student’s audit status may not be changed. Students auditing courses will receive grades of AU (Audit).

Class Attendance

Academic success is closely associated with regular class attendance and course participation. All successful students, whether on campus or online, are expected to be highly self-motivated. All students are required to participate in courses regularly and are obliged to participate in class activities and complete and submit assignments following their professors’ instructions. Students taking courses during compressed semester time frames such as mini-mester, summer sessions, and mid-semester should plan to spend significantly more time per week on the course.  Responsibility for work missed because of illness or school business is placed upon the student.

Instructors are required to include in their syllabi the attendance policy for the courses(s) they teach. The College considers absences equal to or greater than 15% of the course’s requirements to be excessive.

Students enrolled in developmental courses face additional consequences for poor attendance. See the Attendance section of the Academic Success Plan.

In online courses, a student shall be considered present and/or having attended in he/she has completed one of the following:

  • Student makes a post to a class discussion
  • Student submits a written assignment or project vi file upload
  • Student takes a quiz or exam
  • Student submits work through a third party software such as Pearson or McGraw Hill, and the grade is transferred to the LMS Gradebook
  • An email from the student showing that the student initiated contact with a faculty member to ask a question about the academic subject studied in the course

Student Absences on Religious Holy Days

Grayson College will allow students who are absent from class for the observance of a religious holiday to take an examination or complete an assignment scheduled for that day within a reasonable time after the absence. The form for requesting absence for holy days may be obtained from the Vice President of Instruction.

“Religious holy day” denotes a holy day observed by a religion whose places of worship are exempt from property taxation under section 11:20, Tax Code.

A student who is excused under this section may not be penalized for the absence, but the instructor may appropriately respond if the student fails to satisfactorily complete the assignment or examination.

Dropping a Class

A class drop means that a student has dropped one or more classes but remains enrolled in other classes for the semester. During periods of early registration, students who enroll on-line using My Viking may also drop one or more classes via the same method. After the deadline for schedule changes passes, all drops must be handled by the student contacting each professor or program director either in person or via email for the course(s) they wish to drop. Professors will email drops@grayson.edu to request a drop. No drop requests will be accepted after the drop deadline for the semester. The Office of Admissions and Records does not accept drop deadline appeals. Students may not drop courses at Grayson College over the phone.

SB 1231 State of Texas Limit on Drops

(ONLY affects drops occurring after census date)

Under section 51.907 of the Texas Education Code, “an institution of higher education may not permit student to drop more than six courses, including any course a transfer student has dropped at another institution of higher education.” This statute was enacted by the State of Texas in spring 2007 and applies to students who enroll in a public institution of higher education as first-time freshmen in fall 2007 or later. Any course that a student drops is counted toward the six-course limit if (1) the student drops a course after census date or (2) the student is not dropping the course in order to withdraw from the institution. Some exemptions for good cause could allow a student to drop a course without having it counted toward this limit, but it is the responsibility of the student to establish that good cause before the drop. Students with questions should contact the Advising Office or the Office of Admissions & Records for more information before dropping a course!

Exceptions for Good Cause. A student shall be permitted to exceed the limit on the number of dropped courses for any of the following reasons:

  1. A severe illness or other debilitating condition that affects the student’s ability to satisfactorily complete a course;
  2. The care of a sick, injured, or needy person if providing that care affects the student's ability to satisfactorily complete a course;
  3. The death of a member of the student’s family;
  4. The death of a person who has a sufficiently close relationship to the student;
  5. The student’s active military duty service;
  6. The active military service of a member of the student’s family or a person who has a sufficiently close relationship to the student; or
  7. A change in the student’s work schedule that is beyond the student’s control and affects the student’s ability to satisfactorily complete the course.

Withdrawing from College

A withdrawal indicates a student is no longer enrolled in any courses at the College for the term. During periods of registration, students who enroll on-line using My Viking may also withdraw from school via the same method. Students wishing to withdraw from all courses must first contact their professor or program director in person or via email.  After contact is made, students should proceed to advising for further instructions. Students may not withdraw from Grayson College over the phone.

Students who withdraw prior to the semester drop deadline will receive a W. The Office of Admissions and Records does not accept withdrawal date deadline appeals.

Merely discontinuing class attendance does not constitute withdrawal from school. Students who do not officially withdraw may be given grades of “F” at the discretion of the instructor.

Change of Schedule

During periods of registration, students who have registered on-line using My Viking may change their schedules via the same method. Students cannot change their schedule or drop a class on-line through My Viking after the schedule change deadline. All students who wish to change their schedules must do so before the end of the schedule change period published in the student planner. After the deadline, classes are dropped in Advising until the drop deadline for the semester. Classes dropped on or before the official census date of the term will not appear on the student’s transcript.

Credit Award Program

The credit award program is a means by which students may be awarded college credit for past experience or education that is equivalent to courses offered at Grayson College. The learning must be applicable to the student’s educational goals. Credit may be awarded by the following methods:

1. CLEP 6. TECH PREP
2. ADVANCED PLACEMENT EXAM 7. MILITARY TRAINING/COLLEGE CREDIT FOR HEROES (CCFH)
3. DEPARTMENTAL EXAM 8. DANTES
4. INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE 9. PROFESSIONAL CERTIFICATION
5. CLOCK HOUR CONVERSION

                      

Students seeking credit award for tests other than those listed above should check with the Admissions and Records Office. A student may not receive credit award for courses in which he/she has enrolled at GC or any other regionally accredited institution. A maximum of 24 credit hours may be earned through credit award. Credit award is accomplished on a course by course basis. A grade of “P” will be given for the courses earned through credit award. No grade points are associated with the grade of “P.” Although credit award may count toward hours needed for graduation at GC, other institutions are not obligated to accept the credit awarded because each institution sets is own policy regarding tests and scores accepted for credit award. Accordingly, students transferring credit awarded at other institutions must meet GC credit award requirements for the credit to be posted at GC. International students may not apply credit award towards the 12-hour enrollment requirement according to the Department of Homeland Security.

Military Service Credit Award

Veteran students must provide GC with a copy of their Joint Service Transcript (JST). GC will evaluate each military training transcript for course equivalency on a course-by-course basis. An academically qualified faculty member will conduct all course equivalency evaluations. Upon the transcript evaluations, all eligible courses are added to the GC transcript. Transcribed courses may not exceed seventy-five percent (75%) of the total credit required in the declared degree program. Twenty five percent (25%) of the credit in the declared degree program must bed earned by taking courses at Grayson College.

A grade of “P” is given for the courses earned through military credit award. No grade points are associated with the grade of “P”. Military award credit may count towards hours needed for graduation at GC. Other institutions’ are not obligated to accept the credit awarded. Accordingly, students transferring credit awarded at other institutions must meet GC credit award requirements for the credit to be posted at GC.

In addition, Veteran students will have their JSTs evaluated by the Texas College Credit for Heroes (CCFH) program. Approved credits will result in an official transcript from Central Texas College.

Mirror Course Credit Award

GC offers "mirror courses" that allow enrollment into a regular academic credit class through the Continuing Education (CE) department. No formal college admission process is required. Students earn a grade of either “S” for satisfactorily passing course requirements or a “U” for unsatisfactory (failing the class), but receive no academic credit for these mirror courses. However, academic credit may be sought under the following conditions:

  1. The course in which the student enrolled is equivalent to or the same course taught for credit.
  2. The student has successfully completed at least 6 credit hours of academic coursework at the time of application for converting the mirror course to credit.
  3. The request is made no more than 3 years from the start of the semester in which the mirror course was taken.
  4. Credit may not be granted for courses that have an unmet TSI requirement.

The student’s transcript will reflect “P” in the pass/fail grade for satisfactorily completing the course. This course will not be calculated in the student's GPA.

No more than nine credit hours of mirror coursework may be converted to credit. In special situations, permission to complete more than nine hours of mirror coursework may be granted by the Vice President of Instruction or the appropritate Dean.

AP Credit Award - Grayson College (updated 2017)

AP Test Minimum Score Requirement Course(s) credited


Art History 3 ARTS 1303
4 or 5 ARTS 1303 & 1304
Biology 3 BIOL 1406
4 or 5 BIOL 1406 & 1407
Calculus AB 3 MATH 2413 Calculus I
Calculus BC 3 MATH 2413 & 2414 Calculus II
Chemistry 3 CHEM 1411
4 or 5 CHEM 1411 & CHEM 1412
Computer Science A 3 COSC 1336
4 or 5 COSC 1336 & COSC 1337
Economics (Macro) 3 ECON 2301
Economics (Micro) 3 ECON 2302
English Literature and Comp 3 ENGL 1301
4 or 5 ENGL 1301 & ENGL 1302
English Language and Comp 3 ENGL 1301
4 or 5 ENGL 1301 & ENGL 1302
Physics B 3 PHYS 1401
4 or 5 PHYS 1401 & PHYS 1402
Physics C 3 PHYS 2425
4 or 5 PHYS 2425 & PHYS 2426
Psychology 3 or higher PSYC 2301
Spanish Language and Culture 3 SPAN 1411 (Spanish I)
4 SPAN 1411 & 1412 (Spanish I, II)
5 SPAN 1411, 1412, & 2311 (Spanish I, II, III)
Spanish Literature and Culture 3 SPAN 2311 (Spanish III)  
4 SPAN 2311 & 2312 (Spanish III and IV)
5 SPAN 2311, 2312, & 2321 (Spanish III, IV, and Lit.I)
Statistics 3 or higher MATH 1342
Studio Art (Drawing Port.) 3 or higher ARTS 1316
U.S. Government & Politics 3 GOVT 2305 Federal Government
US History 3 HIST 1301
4 or 5 HIST 1301 & HIST 1302

 

CLEP Testing Policy

GC is an open CLEP testing facility. Students who believe they possess the knowledge and skills essential in certain courses or programs offered by GC may challenge these by examination through CLEP. GC students and others in the community interested in taking a CLEP test should contact the GC Testing Center for information.

 

RN to BSN Credit Award     * (pending approval by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges)

Students seeking to transfer credit awarded by other institutions toward entry into the RN to BSN program must meet Grayson College’s credit award requirements.  Credit Award is accomplished on a course-by-course basis. At least 25 percent of the credit hours required for an undergraduate degree must be earned through instruction offered by Grayson College.  A maximum of 33 credit hours may be earned through credit award. A grade of “P” will be given for the courses earned through credit award. No grade points are associated with the grade of “P”.

Students seeking credit award should bring a copy of the RN license and official transcript(s), or other test scores to the Health Science Advisor or Admissions and Records Office, and complete and sign the Credit Award Application.  No fee will be charged for any credit award transactions.

 

International Baccalaureate Diploma

The International Baccalaureate Diploma is an international program of courses and exams offered at the high school level. Texas institutions of higher education must award 24 hours of course specific college credit in subject-appropriate areas on all IB exams with scores of 4 or above as long as the incoming freshmen have earned an IB diploma. However, course credit does not have to be awarded on any IB exams where the score received is a 3 or less. This may mean that such students will not receive 24 hours of college credit, even if they have an IB diploma. Students bringing in an IB transcript for credit evaluation should consider the total number of qualifying credits to be awarded. Additional hours above the required amount to graduate may have an adverse impact on students’ financial aid or other grant programs.  In addition, no Texas public university or college shall be required to accept in transfer or toward a degree program more than sixty-six (66) semester credit hours of lower division academic credit.


GC Credit for International Baccalaureate Diploma

 

IB Examination Score GC Course Credit Hours

Biology (SL) 4, 5, 6, or 7 BIOL 1406 4
Biology (HL) 4, 5, 6, or 7 BIOL 1406 & 1407 8
Business & Management 4, 5, 6, or 7 BUSI 1301 3
Chemistry (SL) 4, 5, 6, or 7 CHEM 1411 4
Chemistry (HL) 4, 5, 6, or 7 CHEM 1411 & 1412 8
Computer Science 4, 5, 6, or 7 COSC 1301 3
Economics (SL) 4, 5, 6, or 7 ECON 2301 & 2302 6
Economics (HL) 4, 5, 6, or 7 ECON 2301 & 2302 6
English (SL) Language A1 or A2 4, 5, 6, or 7 ENGL 1301 or 1302 6
English (HL) Language A1 or A2 4, 5, 6, or 7 ENGL 1301 or 1302 6
Geography 4, 5, 6, or 7 GEOG 2312 3
Greek Classical 4, 5, 6, or 7 LANG 1411 8
History of the Americas (HL) 4, 5, 6, or 7 HIST 1301 or 1302 6
Latin (SL) 4, 5, 6, or 7 LANG 1411 & 1412 8
Latin (HL) 4, 5, 6, or 7 LANG 1411, 1412, 2311, & 2312 14

MATHEMATICS (HL)
Mathematics (HL) 4, 5, 6, or 7 MATH 1314 & 1316 6
Mathematics with Further Math 4, 5, 6, or 7 MATH 1314, 1316, & 2342 9
Mathematical Methods 4, 5, 6, or 7 MATH 2513 5
Mathematical Studies 4, 5, 6, or 7 MATH 1425 4

MODERN LANGUAGES
Language A1 or A2 (SL)
French 4, 5, 6, or 7 LANG 1411 & 1412 8
German 4, 5, 6, or 7 LANG 1411 & 1412 8
Portuguese 4, 5, 6, or 7 LANG 1411 & 1412 8
Russian 4, 5, 6, or 7 LANG 1411 & 1412 8
Spanish 4, 5, 6, or 7 LANG 1411 & 1412 8
Language A1 or A2 (HL)
French 4, 5, 6, or 7 LANG 1411, 1412, 2311, & 2312 14
German 4, 5, 6, or 7 LANG 1411, 1412, 2311, & 2312 14
Portuguese 4, 5, 6, or 7 LANG 1411, 1412, 2311, & 2312 14
Russian 4, 5, 6, or 7 LANG 1411, 1412, 2311, & 2312 14
Spanish 4, 5, 6, or 7 SPAN 1411, 1412, 2311, & 2312 14
Language B (SL)
French 4, 5, 6, or 7 LANG 1411 & 1412 8
German 4, 5, 6, or 7 LANG 1411 & 1412 8
Portuguese 4, 5, 6, or 7 LANG 1411 & 1412 8
Russian 4, 5, 6, or 7 LANG 1411 & 1412 8
Spanish 4, 5, 6, or 7 SPAN 1411 & 1412 8
Language B (HL)
French 4, 5, 6, or 7 LANG 1411, 1412, 2311, & 2312 14
German 4, 5, 6, or 7 LANG 1411, 1412, 2311, & 2312 14
Portuguese 4, 5, 6, or 7 LANG 1411, 1412, 2311, & 2312 14
Russian 4, 5, 6, or 7 LANG 1411, 1412, 2311, & 2312 14
Spanish 4, 5, 6, or 7 LANG 1411, 1412, 2311, & 2312 14
Language AB Initio
French 4, 5, 6, or 7 LANG 1411 4
German 4, 5, 6, or 7 LANG 1411 4
Portuguese 4, 5, 6, or 7 LANG 1411 4
Russian 4, 5, 6, or 7 LANG 1411 4
Spanish 4, 5, 6, or 7 SPAN 1411 4
Music 4, 5, 6, or 7 MUSI 1306 & 1311 6
Philosophy 4, 5, 6, or 7 PHIL 1301 3
Physics (SL) 4, 5, 6, or 7 PHYS 1401 4
Physics (HL) 4, 5, 6, or 7 PHYS 1401 & 1402 8
Psychology 4, 5, 6, or 7 PSYC 2301 3
Social & Cultural Anthropology 4, 5, 6, or 7 ANTH 2351 3
Theatre 4, 5, 6, or 7 DRAM 1310 3
Visual Arts 4, 5, 6, or 7 ARTS 1301 3

 

Grading and Academic Standing

Grade Reports and Transcripts

Final grades are available to students through My Viking. A transcript of college work is an official copy of the student’s permanent record listing all course work at the College and bearing the signature of the Registrar. Students may obtain copies of their official transcript by following the steps listed online. Official transcripts will not be released to students with academic or financial holds until such holds are cleared.

Academic Achievement Grading and Credit (EGA Local)

The College District shall have appropriate standards for evaluating student performance and for determining grades and graduation requirements.

The College District uses the following grading system:

A         —        The student demonstrates mastery of course content and meets course objectives.  The grade of “A” is an exceptional grade attained by students demonstrating exceptional performance of college-level work.

B         —        The student demonstrates mastery of course content and meets selected objectives.  The grade of “B” is an above-average grade attained by students demonstrating above-average performance of college-level work.

C         —        The student demonstrates acceptable competency in coursework and meets selected course objectives.  The grade of “C” is an average grade attained by students demonstrating average performance of college-level work.  Students with concurrent enrollment for high school and college credit must maintain a minimal grade of “C” in the course.

D         —        The student demonstrates minimal performance in coursework and does not meet course objectives.  The grade of “D” is considered unsatisfactory in a student’s major field of study, and this grade generally does not transfer.

F         —        Failure.  No credit is given for the grade of “F.”

I           —        Incomplete.  The grade of “I” indicates that the student has a valid excuse for failure to complete the work required during the semester.

                        Incomplete work should be completed within the regular term.

                        Failure to remove an “I” during the succeeding regular term may result in an “F” being placed on the permanent record.

W        —        Withdrew. Dropped before automatic withdrawal date.

P         —        Passing.

S         —        Satisfactory.  Used for nondegree courses.

U         —        Unsatisfactory.  Used for nondegree courses.

NC      —        Noncredit.  Used for audited courses.

Value of Grade Points

In determining grade point averages (GPAs), all hours where grade points are given shall be considered in computing GPAs.

Grade points are granted on college courses on the basis of the value in semester hours of the course and the grade made in the course as follows:

A = 4 grade points per semester hour

B = 3 grade points per semester hour

C = 2 grade points per semester hour

D = 1 grade point per semester hour

E = 0 grade points per semester hour

Grade Point Determination

The GPA is computed by dividing the total number of grade points earned by the total number of semester hours attempted.  Grades of I, W, P, S, U, NC, and F in pass/fail courses are excluded from GPA calculation.

Grades earned in developmental courses are also excluded from GPA calculation.

Instructional Services

The College District accepts appropriate coursework from accredited institutions outside the United States, provided that the student successfully completed the courses.

 

Scholastic Standards

Good Standing: A student will be considered in good academic standing with a cumulative grade-point average (GPA) of 2.00 or higher.

Academic Warning: A student will be placed on academic warning when the cumulative GPA falls below 2.00 for one long semester.

Academic Probation: When a student’s cumulative GPA remains below a 2.0 for more than one long semester, the student will be placed on academic probation. Students on probation will be required to meet with their Success Coach to establish an individualized success plan. Students on academic probation are not eligible to hold office in student clubs/organizations.

PLEASE NOTE:  Financial Aid Satisfactory Academic Progress is a separate policy and may affect financial aid eligibility (please see the Financial Aid Satisfactory Academic Progress policy for further details).

 

President’s and Dean’s Lists

The GC President’s and Dean’s lists are awarded at the end of the fall and spring semester to students who have demonstrated outstanding achievement in their coursework. Students must be enrolled in at least 12 hours at GC during the fall or spring semester. Developmental courses, incomplete courses, credit awards and courses with “W” or “P” grades are not counted in the full-time determination for the honor. 

The President’s list will be awarded to students earning a 4.0 GPA. The Dean’s list will be awarded to students earning a 3.75 to 3.99 GPA.

Registration

Registration dates and times are available online via the GC website. All tuition and fees must be paid by payment deadlines. Payment may be made by cash, check, payment plan, MasterCard, Visa, or Discover cards. Students who have financial or academic holds on their records will not be allowed to register until the hold is cleared by the appropriate office.

 

Admission and Records Office

The Office of Admission and Records assists prospective, current and former students.  Students can contact this office for assistance with admission applications and requirements, registration, graduation, enrollment verifications, audit forms, add/drop courses, withdrawal forms, credit awards, residency appeals and transcripts.

Verification of Enrollment

Students may contact the Assistant Registrar in order to request verification of enrollment.

Verification of Student Degrees

Grayson College has partnered with the National Student Clearinghouse to provide degree verifications. Students, employment agencies, credit issuers and other student service providers can contact the National Student Clearinghouse directly to receive degree verification at 703.742.7791 or www.studentclearinghouse.org.

Self-Service Transcript Requests

Students may print out unofficial transcripts (listed as Letter Transcript) from the My Viking student portal.

In addition, all former and current students can visit www.studentclearinghouse.org to request an official transcript. A fee of $5.00 will be charged and can be paid with a major credit card. Requests are typically handled within three business days. Some record holds can prevent obtainment of official transcript.

Curriculum Design Degrees and Certificates (EFB Legal)

 

Academic Associate Degree. An “academic associate degree” is an associate degree that will satisfy the lower-division requirements for a baccalaureate degree in a specific discipline. 

19 TAC 9.1(1)

Academic Courses. “Academic courses” are semester credit courses included or allowed under the provisions of the Lower-Division Academic Course Guide Manual designed for college transfer to institutions of higher education in completion of associate and baccalaureate degree programs. 

19 TAC 9.1(2)

Applied Associate Degree. An “applied associate degree” is an associate degree intended to lead directly to employment following graduation and may satisfy the lower-division requirements for a baccalaureate degree in a specific discipline. 

19 TAC 9.1(3)

Associate Degree Program. An “associate degree program” is a grouping of courses designed to lead the individual directly to employment in a specific career or to transfer to an upper-level baccalaureate program.  This specifically refers to the associate of arts (AA), associate of science (AS), associate of applied arts (AAA), associate of applied science (AAS), and associate of occupational studies (AOS) degrees.  The term "applied" in an associate degree name indicates a program designed to qualify students for immediate employment. 

19 TAC 9.1(4)

Career Technical/Workforce Program. “Career technical/workforce program” is an applied associate degree program or a certificate program for which semester credit hours, quarter credit hours, or continuing education units are awarded and which is intended to prepare students for immediate employment or a job upgrade in a specific occupation. 

19 TAC 9.1(5)

Certificate Program. “Certificate program” means workforce programs designed for entry-level employment or for upgrading skills and knowledge within an occupation.  Certificate programs serve as building blocks and exit points for AAS degree programs. 

19 TAC 9.1(7)

Continuing Education Unit or CEU. A “continuing education unit or CEU” is defined as ten contact hours of participation in an organized continuing education experience under responsible sponsorship, capable direction, and qualified instruction, as outlined in the Guidelines for Instructional Programs in Workforce Education. 

19 TAC 9.1(11)

Technical Courses or Programs. “Technical courses or programs” mean workforce education courses or programs for which semester/quarter credit hours are awarded. 

19 TAC 9.1(28)

Workforce Continuing Education Course. “Workforce continuing education course” means a course offered for CEUs with an occupationally specific objective and supported by state funding.  A career technical/workforce continuing education course differs from a community service course offered for recreational or vocational purposes and is not supported by state funding. 

19 TAC 9.1(31)

Workforce Education. “Workforce education” means career technical/workforce courses and programs for which semester/quarter credit hours and/or CEUs are awarded and vocational courses and programs for which CEUs are awarded.  Workforce career technical/workforce education courses and programs prepare students for immediate employment or a job upgrade within specific occupational categories.

19 TAC 9.1(32)

Academic Degree Programs. An academic associate degree may be called an associate of arts (AA), an associate of science (AS), or an associate of arts in teaching (AAT) degree. 

19 TAC 9.183(a)

The AA is the default title for an academic associate degree program if the college district offers only one type of academic degree program. 

19 TAC 9.183(a)(1)

If a college district offers both AA and AS degrees, the degree programs may be differentiated in one of two ways, including:

  1. The AA program may have additional requirements in the liberal arts and/or the AS program may have additional requirements in disciplines such as science, mathematics, or computer science; or
  2. The AA program may serve as a foundation for the bachelor of arts (BA) degree and the AS program for the bachelor of science (BS) degree.

Each academic associate degree must provide a clearly-articulated curriculum that can be associated with a discipline or field of study leading to a baccalaureate degree, and must be identified as such in the institution's program inventory.

19 TAC 9.183(a)(2)

The AAT is a specialized academic associate degree program designed to transfer in its entirety to a baccalaureate program that leads to initial Texas teacher certification.  This title should only be used for an associate degree program that consists of a Coordinating Board-approved AAT curriculum.  19 TAC 9.183(a)(3)

Semester Credit Hours. Academic associate degree programs must consist of 60 semester credit hours (SCH).  If the number of SCH required to complete a proposed academic associate's degree exceeds 60, the institution must provide detailed written documentation describing the compelling academic reason for the number of required hours, such as programmatic accreditation requirements, statutory requirements, or licensure/certification requirements that cannot be met without exceeding the 60-hour limit. The Coordinating Board will review the documentation provided and make a determination to approve or deny a request to exceed the 60-hour limit. Institutions of higher education must be in compliance with this subsection on or before the 2015 fall semester. 

19 TAC 9.183(b)–(c)

Curriculum. Except as provided below, academic associate degree programs must incorporate the institution's approved core curriculum as prescribed by 19 Administrative Code 4.28, relating to Core Curriculum, and 19 Administrative Code 4.29, relating to Core Curricula Larger than 42 SCH.

  1. A college may offer a specialized academic associate degree that incorporates a Coordinating Board-approved field of study curriculum as prescribed by 19 Administrative Code 4.32, relating to Field of Study Curricula, and a portion of the college’s approved core curriculum if the coursework for both would total more than 60 SCH; or
  2. A college may offer a specialized academic associate degree that incorporates a voluntary statewide transfer compact and a portion of the college’s approved core curriculum if the coursework for both would total more than 60 SCH.
  3. A college that has a signed articulation agreement with a General Academic Teaching Institution to transfer a specified curriculum may offer a specialized AA or AS, but not AAT, degree program that incorporates that curriculum.

19 TAC 9.183(d)

New Academic Associate Degree Programs. New academic associate degree programs shall be approved if all of the conditions set out below are met.

The institution shall certify that the following criteria have been met:

  1. The program has institution and governing board approval.
  2. There is recent evidence of both short-term and long-term student demand for the program.
  3. Enrollment projections reflect student demand estimates to ensure the financial self-sufficiency of the program.
  4. The institution has an enrollment management plan for the program.
  5. If the program does not follow a Coordinating Board-approved field of study curriculum or a Coordinating Board-approved statewide articulation transfer curriculum, the institution has or will initiate a process to establish transfer of credit articulation agreements for the program with senior-level institutions.
  6. The program is designed to be consistent with the standards of the Southern Association of Colleges Commission on Colleges (SACSCOC), other applicable accrediting agencies, and is in compliance with applicable licensing authority requirements.
  7. Adequate funding is available to cover all new costs to the institution over the first five years after the implementation of the program.
  8. The program complies with all applicable provisions contained in divisions of 19 Administrative Code Chapter 9, Subchapter J and adheres to the Standards for Academic Associate Degree Programs approved by the Coordinating Board.

The institution proposing the program shall notify all public institutions within 50 miles of the teaching site of their intention to offer the program at least 30 days prior to submitting their request to the Coordinating Board.  If no objections are received, the Coordinating Board staff shall update the institution's program inventory accordingly.  If objections occur, the proposed program shall not be implemented until all objections are resolved.  If the proposing institution cannot resolve the objection(s), the proposing institution may request the assistance of the assistant commissioner of workforce, academic affairs and research to mediate the objections and determine whether the proposing institution may implement the proposed program.

The Coordinating Board delegates to the commissioner final approval authority for all certificate programs, applied associate degree programs, and academic associate degrees that meet Board policies for approval as outlined in the Guidelines for Instructional Programs in Workforce Education and 19 Administrative Code Chapter 9, Subchapter J.  The commissioner may delegate this final authority.

19 TAC 9.184(a)

Audits. The Coordinating Board reserves the right to audit a certificate or degree program at any time to ensure compliance with any of the requirements of 19 Administrative Code Chapter 9, Subchapter J.  19 TAC 9.184(b)

Multidisciplinary Studies Associate Degree Program. The governing board of each public junior college district shall establish a multidisciplinary studies associate degree program which meets the requirements of 19 Administrative Code Chapter 9, Subchapter L at each junior college in the district.  A multidisciplinary studies associate degree program is a coordinating board-approved associate of arts or associate of science degree composed of the college’s core curriculum and enough additional courses to equal 60 semester credit hours (SCH).  The SCH beyond the core curriculum must be selected by the student, in consultation with an academic adviser, and transfer to a specific field of study or major at a university of the student’s choice.

A multidisciplinary studies associate degree program established at a junior college under 19 Administrative Code 9.553 must require a student to successfully complete:

  1. The junior college's core curriculum adopted under Texas Education Code 61.822(b); and
  2. After completion of the core curriculum described above, the courses selected by the student in the student's completed degree plan accounts for all remaining credit hours required for the completion of the degree program; and
  3. Emphasizes the student's transition to a particular four-year college or university that the student chooses; and prepare for the student's intended field of study or major at the four-year college or university.

Education Code 130.0104(a)–(b); 19 TAC 9.552(5), .553.–554

Notwithstanding Texas Education Code 51.9685, before the beginning of the regular semester or term immediately following the semester or term in which a student successfully completes a cumulative total of 30 or more semester credit hours for coursework in a multidisciplinary studies associate degree program established under this section, the student must meet with an academic adviser to complete a degree plan, as defined by Education Code 51.9685(a)(1) [see EFBC], that:

  1. Accounts for all remaining credit hours required for the completion of the degree program; and
  2. Emphasizes the student's transition to a particular four-year college or university that the student chooses; and
  3. Preparations for the student's intended field of study or major at the four-year college or university.

Education Code 130.0104(c); 19 TAC 9.555

Academic Certificate. Institutions of higher education, including college districts, are encouraged to develop undergraduate academic certificate programs of less than degree length.  Undergraduate academic certificates may be awarded upon the completion of:

  1. The Coordinating Board-approved core curriculum of the institution;
  2. A Coordinating Board-approved field of study curriculum; or
  3. Fifty percent of the courses specified in a voluntary statewide transfer compact.

Undergraduate academic certificates that meet one of the criteria above require Coordinating Board notification and are automatically approved.

19 TAC 4.36, 9.185

Career Technical Workforce Degree and Certificate Programs. Requests for new associate degree and certificate programs shall be made in accordance with the procedures stipulated in 19 TAC 9.93(b), below.

Public two-year colleges shall request new associate degree and certificate programs using the appropriate degree program request form.  Public two-year colleges must submit documentation sufficient to establish that the new program meets all of the criteria listed below.  Coordinating Board staff will review all requests for new programs within five business days of receipt. If Coordinating Board staff determines that the request is incomplete and additional information or documentation is needed, the institution must respond with all of the requested information or documentation within ten working days or the request will be returned to the institution. An institution may resubmit a request that was incomplete as soon as it has obtained the requested information or documentation.

New associate degree and certificate programs shall be approved if all of the following conditions are met, provided that the number of SCH required to complete a proposed associate degree program does not exceed 60 SCH.

  1. The institution shall certify that:
    1. The program has institutional and governing board approval.
    2. The institution has researched and documented current job market need for the program and/or that the program would lead to opportunities for further education.
    3. There is recent evidence of both short-term and long-term student demand for the program.
    4. Enrollment projections reflect student demand estimates to ensure the financial self-sufficiency of the program.
    5. Basic and career technical/workforce skills have been integrated into the curriculum.
    6. The institution has an enrollment management plan for the program.
    7. The institution has or will initiate a process to establish articulation agreements for the program with secondary and/or senior-level institutions.
    8. The program is designed to be consistent with the standards of the SACSCOC, and with the standards of other applicable accrediting agencies, and is in compliance with appropriate licensing authority requirements.
    9. The program would not unnecessarily duplicate existing programs at other institutions.
    10. Representatives from private sector business and industry have been involved in the creation of the program through participation in an advisory committee.
    11. Adequate funding is available to cover all new costs to the institution over the first five years after the implementation of the program.
    12. New costs during the first five years of the program would not exceed $2 million.
    13. The institution has an improvement plan in place for all career technical/workforce programs that do not currently meet Coordinating Board standards for both graduation and placement.
    14. The appropriate Higher Education Regional Council has been notified in writing of the proposal for a new program, and no unresolved objections to the program have been reported.
    15. Skill standards recognized by the Texas Skill Standards Board, if they exist for the discipline, have been reviewed and considered for inclusion in the curriculum for the program.
  2. If a proposed two-year career technical/workforce education program or certificate program meets the stipulated conditions, the institution shall submit a request to the assistant commissioner for workforce, academic affairs and research to add the program.  If a proposed program does not meet the stipulated conditions, the institution must submit a proposal using the standard electronic new program application process.
  3. If the number of SCH required to complete a proposed associate's program exceeds 60, the institution must provide detailed written documentation describing the compelling academic reason for the number of required hours, such as programmatic accreditation requirements, statutory requirements, or licensure/certification requirements that cannot be met without exceeding the 60-hour limit.  The Coordinating Board will review the documentation provided and make a determination to approve or deny a request to exceed the 60-hour limit.  Institutions of higher education must be in compliance with this paragraph on or before the 2015 fall semester.
  4. The institution proposing the program shall notify all public institutions within 50 miles of the teaching site of their intention to offer the program at least 30 days prior to submitting their request to the Coordinating Board. If no objections are received, the Coordinating Board staff shall update the institution's program inventory accordingly. If objections occur, the proposed program shall not be implemented until all objections are resolved. If the proposing institution cannot resolve the objection(s), the proposing institution may request the assistance of the assistant commissioner of workforce, academic affairs and research to mediate the objections and determine whether the proposing institution may implement the proposed program.
  5. If objections to the proposed program are received by the Coordinating Board staff, the proposed program shall not be implemented until all objections are resolved.

The commissioner shall forward a program to the Coordinating Board for consideration at an appropriate quarterly meeting if either of the following conditions is met: the proposed program is the subject of an unresolved grievance or dispute between institutions; or the commissioner has disapproved the proposed program and the institution has requested a Coordinating Board review.

19 TAC 9.93(a)–(b), (e)

Revisions. Revision of an existing associate degree or certificate program shall be approved if all of the requirements above at item 1 at CAREER TECHNICAL / WORKFORCE DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS are met.  To request a change of Classification of Instructional Programs (CIP) code for an existing degree or certificate program, the institution shall notify the Coordinating Board staff and certify that the revised program meets the requirements listed above at item 1.  If the revision of an existing degree or certificate program meets the conditions stipulated at item 1, the institution shall submit a request to the assistant commissioner for academic affairs and research to revise the program.  The Coordinating Board staff shall update the institution’s program inventory accordingly.  If a program revision does not meet the conditions stipulated, the institution shall submit a revision request using the standard electronic program revision request process.  19 TAC 9.93(f)–(i)

Audits. The Coordinating Board reserves the right to audit a certificate or degree program at any time to ensure compliance with any of the requirements in 19 Administrative Code Chapter 9, Subchapter E.  19 TAC 9.93(m)

Administrative Officials. All programs must be under the direction of an administrator having appropriate authority to ensure that quality is maintained and that programs are conducted in compliance with all applicable laws and rules.  Administrative officers must possess credentials, work experience, and/or demonstrated competence appropriate to their areas of responsibility as specified by the SACSCOC.  19 TAC 9.93(j)

Faculty and Staff. Faculty and staff must be approved by the postsecondary institution.  19 TAC 9.93(k)

Baccalaureate Degree Programs. The Coordinating Board shall authorize public junior colleges to offer baccalaureate degree programs in the fields of applied science and applied technology under Education Code 130.0012.  Offering a baccalaureate degree program under Section 130.0012 does not otherwise alter the role and mission of a public junior college.

The Coordinating Board shall authorize baccalaureate degree programs at each public junior college that previously participated in a pilot project to offer baccalaureate degree programs.

Education Code 130.0012(a)–(b)

Public community colleges authorized by the Coordinating Board to offer baccalaureate degree programs under Education Code 130.0012 may submit requests for new baccalaureate degree programs if:

  1. The proposed degree program has the approval of the college's governing board;
  2. The proposed degree program is not an engineering program; and
  3. The addition of the proposed program to the college's inventory would not exceed five total approved baccalaureate degree programs.

19 TAC 5.56

Limitation on SCH Requirements. To earn an associate degree, a student may not be required by an institution of higher education, including a college district, to complete more than the minimum number of SCH required for the degree by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools or its successor unless the institution determines that there is a compelling academic reason for requiring completion of additional SCH for the degree.  The Coordinating Board may review one or more of an institution's associate degree programs to ensure compliance with this section.

This section does not apply to an associate degree awarded by an institution to a student enrolled in the institution before the 2015 fall semester.  This provision does not prohibit the institution from reducing the number of SCH the student must complete to receive the degree.

Education Code 61.05151

State Funding. No funds appropriated to any public two-year college or other institution providing certificate or associate degree programs shall be expended for any program that has not been approved by the commissioner or the assistant commissioner for workforce, academic affairs and research or, when applicable, by the Coordinating Board.  19 TAC 9.96

Degree-Seeking Students. A student who is concurrently enrolled at more than one institution of higher education may be classified as a degree-seeking student at only one institution.

If a student maintains continuous enrollment from a spring semester to the subsequent fall semester at an institution at which the student has declared to be seeking a degree, the student remains a degree-seeking student at that institution regardless of the student’s enrollment during the intervening summer sessions at another institution.

19 TAC 4.28(d)(2)–(3)

Compensatory Courses. Courses designated as compensatory in the Lower-Division Academic Course Guide Manual may not be used to satisfy degree requirements.  Such courses may be used as co-requisites or prerequisites for degree courses as determined by local institutions.  19 TAC 9.76

Low-Producing Degree Programs. The Coordinating Board may review the number of degrees or certificates awarded through a degree or certificate program every four years or more frequently, at the Coordinating Board's discretion.  The Coordinating Board shall review each degree or certificate program offered by an institution of higher education at least every ten years after a new program is established using the criteria prescribed by Education Code 61.0512(c).  Education Code 61.0512(d)–(e); 19 TAC Ch. 4, Subch. R

Definition. A “low-producing degree program” is a degree program that does not meet the minimum standard for degrees awarded in the program.  For career technical certificates, associate, and bachelor’s programs, the minimum standard is an average of five degrees awarded per academic year, to total not fewer than 25 degrees awarded for any five-year period.  19 TAC 4.287(4)

Completers of career technical certificate programs that are reported under the same CIP code as an existing applied associate's degree program will be counted as completers of the corresponding applied associate's degree program for purposes of determining low-producing status.  Academic associate degree programs are not considered to be low producing if they lead to transfer into four-year programs.  19 TAC 4.288(c)–(d)

Consequences. The Coordinating Board may not order the consolidation or elimination of any degree or certificate program offered by an institution of higher education.  Coordinating Board staff may recommend to the institution's governing board the closure of any non-exempt degree program which has been on the annual list of low-producing programs for three or more consecutive years.  If the governing board does not accept the recommendation to close the program, then the university system or, where a system does not exist, the institution, must identify the program recommended for closure on the next legislative appropriations request submitted by the system or institution.  If a system or institution is required to identify a degree program on its legislative appropriations request, the system or institution should also develop a plan to allow the degree program to achieve the minimum standard for the degree awarded, or if the standard is not attainable, provide a rationale describing the merits of continuing the degree program.  Education Code 61.0512(f); 19 TAC 4.290

Last updated: 06/25/2019